Peppers are tropical plants

and can not tolerate temperatures below 45-50 degrees.

Because they are long in developing, most gardeners will have to start them indoors and plant out into warm soil, with sun from the top. Keep other plants around the edge of the pepper bed to shade the sides. This will prevent sunscald. Basil works well, or flowers, which will also help germination and pest control. Peppers in the wild grow down in summer-dry creekbeds, where they naturally have some shelter from the sides. The leaves are poisonous. Peppers are usually self-pollinating (usually 5-10% crossing, more in the South), so you should be able to save the seed of your favorites.

 This year we are rating the peppers for hotness: 0 is sweet, 5 is hotter than hot.

Capsicum sp. H/Matures 9-12/Harvest up to 17/Yield fresh 36-197, hot dried 5-20/Spacing 12”


Capsicum sp. H/Matures 9-12/Harvest up to 17/Yield fresh 36-197, hot dried 5-20/Spacing 12”
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